America's #1 Balance Bike Destination

America's #1 Balance Bike Destination
America's #1 Balance Bike Destination

07 February 2007

Elif Shafak is also a guest on NPR's Radio Open Source!

Elif Shafak: Voice of a New Turkey
“… all my family tree has been Something Somethingian, and I am the grandchild of genocide survivors who lost all their relatives at the hands of Turkish butchers in 1915″

10 comments:

Anonim said...

What is this quote from Safak's book with no comments supposed to mean? Safak got into trouble with 301 because she had Armenian characters in her book voicing such views. What now? Can a novelist not have characters depicted realistically as they behave and talk in real life?

Murat Altinbasak said...

I did not realize I was quoting her book. Are you sure about that? I thought I was just mirroring what I found at the Radio Open Source website..
A novelist can do whatever he or she wants. Do we all have to like it and salute it? Sheesh!

Bolsa Hye said...

Do you even know what you are liking or not liking? Perhaps if you had read the book, you could form an intelligent and rational opinion on it or its message. So far you're just reacting to nationalist hysteria over it.

I'm dissappointed to see that they've hooked you like a dying palamut looking for its last meal!

Great, now you've got me daydreaming of a nice crispy palamut tavasi with no palamut in sight! Thanks a lot!

Murat Altinbasak said...

I don't care about the book, at the moment. I care about what she had to say on American radio, especially at a time when the infamous 'Genocide Bill' slithers through the halls of Congress. Nationalist hysteria? I beg to differ. All I tried to do is bring some news to readers, who might have otherwise missed it. If I sprinkled it with some of my own insignificant comments, it's nothing for anyone to get alarmed about. My opinions shouldn't trouble you so.. but if crossing swords with me is what blows your hair back, I'll accommodate.
Nobody's hooked me. I am not a "card-carrying-member" of any group or interest, except for the USCF.. and Bally's Total Fitness.

Anonim said...

Murat, why didn't you realize? The complete quote from the Radio Open Source website makes it perfectly clear.

"It is the penetration of Armenian points of view — for example, '… all my family tree has been Something Somethingian, and I am the grandchild of genocide survivors who lost all their relatives at the hands of Turkish butchers in 1915' — that got Elif Shafak criminally charged (before Pamuk was) with 'anti-Turkishness.'"

Bolsa Hye said...

Murat,

There's always going to be some reason to make it an "inconvenient" time to tell the truth. I just listened to the interview, and I'm curious; what exactly did she say in this interview that has roused your ire?

Murat Altinbasak said...

Nothing in particular. Regardless of anything else, it's just cool that a citizen of Turkey is interviewed on American radio, twice in one day. It's not as though I have issues with Elif Shafak. I salute her good work. But the nagging question is at the back of many people's minds.. Would such success or notoriety befall a nationalist author of similar creative talent? Something to ponder.

Bolsa Hye said...

Sorry, but that nagging question is stupid and irrelevant. Just my op.

Anyway, I personally think she is a nationalist Turkish author. What came across loud and clear from her interview is that she obviously cares a great deal about her country, its people, and what's more, she is passionate about the Turkish language and preserving it.

It's all in the way you define a "nationalist". If a nationalist can only be an ethnic Turk who only cares about other ethnic Turks, then she's not a nationalist. But if a Turkish nationalist is someone who cares about the Republic of Turkey, then she's a nationalist.

Murat Altinbasak said...

"It's all in the way you define a "nationalist". If a nationalist can only be an ethnic Turk who only cares about other ethnic Turks, then she's not a nationalist. But if a Turkish nationalist is someone who cares about the Republic of Turkey, then she's a nationalist."

Yes there are many kinds of nationalists, as you suggest. The kind which you describe first though, are racists.. kind of like the Ku Klux Klan. To me, caring about your country, loving your country, even with all it's faults, serving your countrymen and saluting it's flag and pledging allegiance.. are all nationalist attributes. But... for some reason, the definition of a Turkish nationalist has been twisted and contorted into something quite unwholesome. In a sense (I'm in the habit of making comparisons, sorry)... in a sense, it's like the Wahabbiist or Taliban or terrorists who have "hijacked" Islam..

I also consider myself a nationalist, of two countries in fact.. but not the kind which has any regard for ethnicity or race or religion. I hope this much is clear.

Sean said...

THIS IS YOUR TURKEY:

The Bastard of Istanbul, by Elif Shafak, Viking, 360 pp., $24.95

In a better world, Turkish writer Elif Shafak would get more attention for her zesty, imaginative writing and less for the controversy her politics stir up.

Fearing for her safety, Shafak canceled her U.S. book tour to promote her new novel, The Bastard of Istanbul,after the murder of an Armenian Turkish journalist. Shafak has been a target for Turks who deny the 1915 Armenian genocide. Bastard addresses the tragedy, exploring such issues as historical amnesia and overt denial. But it is also a lively look at contemporary Istanbul and family through the eyes of two young women, one Turkish and one Armenian-American. It's like a Turkish version of Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club.

— Deirdre Donahue